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20 Book-to-Screen Adaptations You Won’t Want to Miss in 2022

Romance

1.) Along For The Ride By Sarah Dessen

Nights have always been Auden’s time, her chance to escape everything that’s going on around her. Then she meets Eli, a fellow insomniac, and he becomes her nocturnal tour guide. Now, with an endless supply of summer nights between them, almost anything can happen. Starring Emma Pasarow, Andie MacDowell, and Dermot Mulroney, Dessen’s second adaptation airs on Netflix on May 6, 2022.

2.) 29 Dates By Melissa De La Cruz

Richard Wong, whose Ravi Patel-Gabourey Sidibe road trip comedy Come As You Are was picked up by Samuel Goldwyn last fall, is attached to direct an adaptation of Melissa de La Cruz’s 29 Dates at Disney+. No release date has been set for the film yet. 

Jisu’s traditional South Korean parents are concerned by what they see as her lack of attention to her schoolwork and her future. Working with Seoul’s premiere matchmaker to find the right boyfriend is one step toward ensuring Jisu’s success, and going on the recommended dates is Jisu’s compromise to please her parents while finding space to figure out her own dreams.

But when she flubs a test then skips out on a date to spend time with friends, her fed-up parents shock her by shipping her off to a private school in San Francisco. Where she’ll have the opportunity to shine academically—and be set up on more dates!

3.) Hello, Goodbye, And Everything In Between By Jennifer E. Smith

Jordan Fisher, who played John Ambrose in the Netflix adaptation of To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before, produces and stars in Hello, Goodbye, And Everything In Between alongside Talia Ryder.

This sweet romance about a young couple struggling to decide if they should break up before college is perfect for fans of Jenny Han and Nicola Yoon. On the night before they leave for college, Clare and Aidan only have one thing left to do: figure out whether they should stay together or break up. 

Over the course of twelve hours, they retrace the steps of their relationship, trying to find something in their past that might help them decide what their future should be. The question is, will it be goodbye for now or goodbye forever?

4.) Hush, Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick

Fitzpatrick’s New York Times Bestseller is taking to the screens on November 17, 2023 with Liana Liberato and Wolfgang Novogratz as Nora Grey and Patch Cipriano. Are you excited? We’re holding our breaths ‘til the release date!

For Nora Grey, romance was not part of the plan. She’s never been particularly attracted to the boys at her school, no matter how much her best friend, Vee, pushes them at her. Not until Patch came along.

With his easy smile and eyes that seem to see inside her, Nora is drawn to him against her better judgment.

But after a series of terrifying encounters, Nora’s not sure who to trust. Patch seems to be everywhere she is, and to know more about her than her closest friends. She can’t decide whether she should fall into his arms or run and hide. And when she tries to seek some answers, she finds herself near a truth that is way more unsettling than anything Patch makes her feel. For Nora is right in the middle of an ancient battle between the immortal and those that have fallen—and, when it comes to choosing sides, the wrong choice will cost her life.

Drama

5.) Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret By Judy Blume

Starring Rachel McAdams and Kathy Bates, Blume’s iconic and beloved book is set to hit the big screen on September 16, 2022.

Margaret shares her secrets and her spirituality in this iconic Judy Blume novel, beloved by millions, that now has a fresh new look.

Margaret Simon, almost twelve, likes long hair, tuna fish, the smell of rain, and things that are pink. She’s just moved from New York City to Farbook, New Jersey, and is anxious to fit in with her new friends—Nancy, Gretchen, and Janie. When they form a secret club to talk about private subjects like boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret is happy to belong.

Margaret is funny and real, and her thoughts and feelings are oh-so-relatable—you’ll feel like she’s talking right to you, sharing her secrets with a friend.

6.) Loveboat, Taipei by Abigail Hing Wen

“Our cousins have done this program,” Sophie whispers. “Best kept secret. Zero supervision.”

And just like that, Ever Wong’s summer takes an unexpected turn. Gone is Chien Tan, the strict educational program in Taiwan that Ever was expecting. In its place, she finds Loveboat: a summer-long free-for-all where hookups abound, adults turn a blind eye, snake-blood sake flows abundantly, and the nightlife runs nonstop.

Starring Ashley Liao and Ross Butler, our favorite coming-of-age book is heading to ACE Entertainment.

7.) On The Come Up By Angie Thomas

Starring Sanaa Lathan in her directorial debut, Jamila C. Gray, Method Man, Mike Epps, and Da’Vine Joy Randolph, Thomas’ On The Come Up is set to become the newest Major motion picture.

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill. But it’s hard to get your come up when you’re labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral…for all the wrong reasons.

8.) Paper Girls By Brian K. Vaughan, Cliff Chiang, And Matt Wilson

Four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls from the year 1988 uncover the most important story of all time. Suburban drama and otherworldly mysteries collide in this critically acclaimed series about nostalgia, first jobs, and the last days of childhood.

9.) A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi

Levantine Films has optioned A Very Large Expanse of Sea, with plans to develop the YA novel as a feature film. Tahereh Mafi‘s first contemporary standalone is coming to the screen so brace yourselves for a heartrending coming-of-age story. In a world rocked by violence, we follow Shirin through fear, first love, and the devastating impact of prejudice.

It’s 2002, a year after 9/11. It’s an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who’s tired of being stereotyped.

Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She’s tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments—even the physical violence—she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she’s built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother.

But then she meets Ocean James. He’s the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her—they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds—and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she’s not sure she’ll ever be able to let it down.

10.) The Sky Is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

Jandy Nelson’s beloved, critically adored debut is now an Apple TV+ and A24 original film starring Jason Segel, Cherry Jones, Grace Kaufman, and Jacques Colimon.

Adrift after her sister Bailey’s sudden death, Lennie finds herself torn between quiet, seductive Toby—Bailey’s boyfriend who shares Lennie’s grief—and Joe, the new boy in town who bursts with life and musical genius. Each offers Lennie something she desperately needs. One boy helps her remember. The other lets her forget. And she knows if the two of them collide, her whole world will explode.

As much a laugh-out-loud celebration of love as a nuanced and poignant portrait of loss, Len­nie’s struggle to sort her own melody out out the noise around her makes for an always honest, often uproarious, and absolutely unforgettable read.

11.) Opposite of Always by Justin A. Reynolds

Paramount Players has officially closed the deal and Opposite of Always has been optioned for film to be produced by Temple Hill’s Marty Bowen, John Fischer, and Isaac Klausner.

Justin A. Reynolds delivers a hilarious and heartfelt novel about the choices we make, the people we choose, and the moments that make a life worth reliving. Perfect for fans of Nicola Yoon and John Green. 

When Jack and Kate meet at a party, bonding until sunrise over their mutual love of Froot Loops and their favorite flicks, Jack knows he’s falling—hard. Soon she’s meeting his best friends, Jillian and Franny, and Kate wins them over as easily as she did Jack.

But then Kate dies. And their story should end there. Yet Kate’s death sends Jack back to the beginning, the moment they first meet, and Kate’s there again. Healthy, happy, and charming as ever. Jack isn’t sure if he’s losing his mind. Still, if he has a chance to prevent Kate’s death, he’ll take it. Even if that means believing in time travel. However, Jack will learn that his actions are not without consequences.

And when one choice turns deadly for someone else close to him, he has to figure out what he’s willing to do to save the people he loves.

12.) Anatomy of a Scandal by Sarah Vaughan

Vaughan’s juicy American anthology thriller stars Sienna Miller, Michelle Dockery, and Rupert Friend. The miniseries was developed by David E. Kelley and Melissa James Gibson, and premiered on April 15 through Netflix’s streaming platform.

Some people’s secrets are darker than others.

Sophie Whitehouse has a lovely home, two adorable children, and a handsome, successful husband. In other words, she has the “perfect” life. But everything changes the night her husband James comes home and confesses an indiscretion. Suddenly, her neat, ordered world is turned upside down. Did she ever really know the man she married?

And, as it turns out, James’s revelation is just the tip of the iceberg. He stands accused of a terrible crime. But, the truth is even more shocking than anyone ever could have thought. Is James the guilty perpetrator or an innocent victim of a toxic agenda?

In this riveting story of love, revenge, and deception, no one’s motives are pure, but some people’s secrets are much darker than others.

13.) Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney

Several of the directors, producers, and writers from the hit series Normal People are returning to adapt Conversations including Oscar-nominated director Lenny Abrahamson who will return to helm several episodes, as well as writer Alice Birch, executive producer Ed Guiney, and Rooney herself as executive producer.

Frances is a cool headed and darkly observant young woman, vaguely pursuing a career in writing while studying in Dublin. Her best friend is the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi.

At a local poetry performance one night, they meet a well-known photographer, and as the girls are then gradually drawn into her world, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman’s sophisticated home and handsome husband, Nick. But however amusing Frances and Nick’s flirtation seems at first, it begins to give way to a strange—and then painful—intimacy.

Written with gemlike precision and marked by a sly sense of humor, Conversations with Friends is wonderfully alive to the pleasures and dangers of youth, and the messy edges of female friendship.

Horror

14.) Devil In Ohio By Daria Polatin

Polatin’s horror novel for teens is soon to be a Netflix Limited Series with Emily Deschanel, Alisha Newton, and Sam Jaeger among the names on board the adaptation. A traumatized girl lives with a family after escaping a cult in this debut YA suspense/thriller that was inspired by true events.

When fifteen-year-old Jules Mathis comes home from school to find a strange girl sitting in her kitchen, her psychiatrist mother reveals that Mae is one of her patients at the hospital and will be staying with their family for a few days. 

But soon Mae is wearing Jules’s clothes, sleeping in her bedroom, edging her out of her position on the school paper, and flirting with Jules’s crush. And Mae has no intention of leaving. Then things get weird.

15.) The Midnight Club By Christopher Pike

The new Netflix series from creator Mike Flanagan, best known for his work in The Haunting of Hill House, The Haunting of Bly Manor, and Midnight Mass, will premiere on Friday, October 7. The announcement came as part of Netflix’s Geeked Week celebration of its horror, sci-fi and fantasy content.

Rotterham Home was a hospice for young people—a place where teenages with terminal illnesses went to die. Nobody who checked in ever checked. It was a place of pain and sorrow, but also, remarkably, a place of humor and adventure.

Every night at twelve, a group of five young girls and boys at the hospice came together. They called themselves the Midnight Club, and everytime they came together, they would take turns telling each other stories. Any type of story they could think of, they would tell—ones filled with intrigue and horror, of life and death…true stories, made-up stories, and stories that fell somewhere in between.

But one night, in the middle of a particularly scary story, the five kids make a pact with each other. The first one who dies is to make every effort to contact the others from beyond the grave…

Then one of them does die, and the story begins.

Fantasy/Dystopian/Sci-fi

16.) Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

Peacock is developing a series adaptation of the Victoria Aveyard novel “Red Queen” with Elizabeth Banks attached to executive produce, direct and appear in a major supporting role. Rise Red as the Dawn, Scarlet Guard, it’s about time!

Mare Barrow’s world is divided by blood—those with common, Red blood serve the Silver-blooded elite, who are gifted with superhuman abilities. Mare is a Red, scraping by as a thief in a poor, rural village, until a twist of fate throws her in front of the Silver court. Before the king, princes, and all the nobles, she discovers she has an ability of her own.

To cover up this impossibility, the king forces her to play the role of a lost Silver princess and betrothes her to one of his own sons. As Mare is drawn further into the Silver world, she risks everything and uses her new position to help the Scarlet Guard—a growing Red rebellion—even as her heart tugs her in an impossible direction.

One wrong move can lead to her death, but in the dangerous game she plays, the only certainty is betrayal.

17.) The Upper World by Femi Fadugba

Soon to be a major Netflix movie starring Oscar winner Daniel Kaluuya, Fadugba’s powerhouse, mind-bending YA debut follows two teens, a generation apart, whose fates collide across time—and outside of it.

If you had the chance to change your future, would you take it?

Today

During arguably the worst week of Esso’s life, an accident knocks him into an incredible world—a place beyond space or time, where he can see glimpses of the past and future. 

But if what he sees there is true, he might not have much longer to live, unless he can use his new gift to change the course of history.

Tomorrow

Rhia’s past is filled with questions, none of which she expects a new physics tutor to answer. But Dr. Esso’s not here to help Rhia. He’s here because he needs her help—to unravel a tragedy that happened fifteen years ago. One that holds the key not only to Rhia’s past, but to a future worth fighting for.

18.) Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

Paramount Pictures has acquired the film rights for Children of Blood and Bone, the first book in the Legacy of Orisha trilogy by Tomi Adeyemi. Producing the film will be Wyck Godfrey, Marty Bowen and Karen Rosenfelt.

They killed my mother.

They took our magic.

They tried to bury us.

Now we rise.

19.) Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

Joey King stars in Netflix’s adaptation of Scott Westerfeld’s razor-sharp, dystopian YA novel.

Tally is about to turn sixteen, and she can’t wait. In just a few weeks she’ll have the operation that will turn her from a repellent ugly into a stunningly attractive pretty. And as a pretty, she’ll be catapulted into a high-tech paradise where her only job is to have fun.

But Tally’s new friend Shay isn’t sure she wants to become a pretty.

When Shay runs away, Tally learns about a whole new side of the pretty world—and it isn’t very pretty. The authorities offer Tally a choice: find her friend and turn her in, or never turn pretty at all. Tally’s choice will change her world forever.

20.) Firestarter by Stephen King

Zac Efron stars in the remake of the 1984 film adaptation of King’s science fiction thriller, Firestarter, directed by Keith Thomas from a screenplay by Scott Teems.

Andy McGee and Vicky Tomlinson were once college students looking to make some extra cash, volunteering as test subjects for an experiment orchestrated by the clandestine government organization known as The Shop. But the outcome unlocked exceptional latent psychic talents for the two of them—manifesting in even more terrifying ways when they fell in love and had a child. Their daughter, Charlie, has been gifted with the most extraordinary and uncontrollable power ever seen—pyrokinesis, the ability to create fire with her mind.

Now the merciless agents of The Shop are in hot pursuit to apprehend this unexpected genetic anomaly for their own diabolical ends by any means necessary…including violent actions that may well ignite the entire world around them as Charlie retaliates with a fury of her own.

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